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Posted by on May 18, 2017 in Personal Growth | 0 comments

How to be a Star in Your Second Interview

How to be a Star in Your Second Interview

Congratulations you made it passed your first interview and have been invited back! Being called for a second interview is a sign that you’ve said the right things and check off on their initial selection criteria.

So now you’re being seriously considered for the role and you should be brimming with confidence – but let’s not get complacent or arrogant about it. You could very easily lose this opportunity if you don’t play your cards right. Keep in mind there’s a good chance that there are other candidates who’ve been shortlisted and invited for a second interview as well. And there may be concerns that your future employer would like to discuss otherwise you’d already have the job!

Here are a few tips on what to expect in your second interview and how do you ace through it:

1. Discuss the Specifics

At this point it’s clear that your first interviewers really liked you and that’s why you’ve been given another chance to prove yourself fit for the job. During the second interview expect to be discussing things more openly and touching upon details. You’ll be asked to share highlights and lowlights of your career. Your weaknesses will be probed to gauge whether or not it’ll hamper your ability to perform your duties. They’ll be assessing how well you’ll be able to fit into their culture so make sure to “charm” them with your true self. Expect to be asked competency-based questions as well. There may even be talk about compensation as it’s an integral part of their decision making abilities.

2. Articulate Your Strengths

Pick up from your first interview and tie up loose ends that were brought up in that discussion. It’s a good way to build upon your already exhibited strengths which have worked so far. Discuss challenges that you’ll face in your new job and walk them through your plan on tackling them. Make them believe that you’re seriously committed and have the analytical and realistic abilities to overcome challenges. And since you’re still competing against other shortlisted candidates, try to emphasize on what value you bring. Rather than comparing yourself to others focus on your abilities. Remember not get too ahead of yourself and come off as being arrogant. Instead be enthusiastic, likeable and courteous. Allow your interviewers room to jump in at any point. Second interviews provide a great opportunity to establish a rapport so use this time well.

3. Do Your Homework

The biggest mistake any interviewee makes is being ill-prepared for an interview. Your chances of being selected will significantly improve if you’re stepping into the second interview prepared (maybe even “too” prepared!). Know the company you’re potentially going to work for inside out. The people interviewing you will be anticipating to see your commitment to winning the job, your depth of understanding of the company and its culture and how your capabilities and enthusiasm can take on the challenges of the role. Also, have a list of questions that you’d like to ask. This is where doing your homework matters most as you don’t want to be taken off-guard when given the opportunity to ask your interviewers questions. Make it count by asking smart and well thought out questions that’ll impress them.

You’re halfway there and honestly, if you’ve made it to the second interview the job is yours to lose (or win!). Above all, and most importantly, be honest with yourself and your interviewers. Try not to present a self-portrait that’s not reflective of who you are and what you’re about. Living up to that could very easily become a nightmare on the job.

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